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Have You Thought to Learn About the Ways an Independent Shopping Cart Can Immediately Boost Your Online Art and Related Product Sales?

If you sell anything online, whether digital products and services or physical goods, a shopping cart is required to process the order and interface with a payment processor. Some payment processors, for instance, PayPal provides buttons and links you can use to place on your website, or in an email or blog post. However, since […]

The post Have You Thought to Learn About the Ways an Independent Shopping Cart Can Immediately Boost Your Online Art and Related Product Sales? appeared first on Art Marketing News | Prosperous Ideas for Artists.

Featured Artist Alexey Adonin

Dreamlike oil paintings by Alexey Adonin flow with light and color, unveiling the world beneath reality. Visit his website to learn more about this fascinating artist.

 

“New Age” Oil on Canvas, 35” x 35”

“New Age” Oil on Canvas, 35” x 35”

 

I believe that art is not only a way to express ourselves, but also a unique key to unlocking the knowledge of the hidden world.

 

“Phantasma” Oil on Canvas, 39” x 28”

“Phantasma” Oil on Canvas, 39” x 28”

 

From a very young age, I sought to explore this unseen realm, relying on my intuition to find the answers I seek.

 

“Call of the Earth” Oil on Canvas, 39” x 28”

“Call of the Earth” Oil on Canvas, 39” x 28”

 

Although I am mostly interested in something more exalted, I love nature and often hiking. A solitude with nature helps me to gain solace that gives me an opportunity to convey my thoughts on canvas with stronger confidence.

 

“Shore of Fancies” Oil on Canvas, 35” x 35”

“Shore of Fancies” Oil on Canvas, 35” x 35”

 

I approach my work without preconception, allowing spontaneous things to happen at the very first. This is what shapes the basic composition at the initial stage.

 

“The Immanence” Oil on Canvas, 39” x 28”

“The Immanence” Oil on Canvas, 39” x 28”

 

Finally, I take advantage of an amazing ability of the human mind to find order in chaos—this ability lets me discover the details.

 

“Objects in a State of Consciousness” Oil on Canvas, 35” x 35”

“Objects in a State of Consciousness” Oil on Canvas, 35” x 35”

 

I mostly strive to get away from banal copying of reality, preferring instead to create one of my own—something that somehow reflects my inner world.

 

“The Wild” Oil on Canvas, 35” x 35”

“The Wild” Oil on Canvas, 35” x 35”

 

Life is an enigma that does not have any logical explanation. In my creative endeavor, I try to apply a more philosophical approach and to hint at the mystical origin of all things.

 

“Mama-Substrata” Oil on Canvas, 39” x 28”

“Mama-Substrata” Oil on Canvas, 39” x 28”

 

I don’t work with computers, or image sources—everything is created “through imagination” to reach a broader sensibility and greater satisfaction.

 

“Solace in Solitude” Oil on Canvas, 35” x 35”

“Solace in Solitude” Oil on Canvas, 35” x 35”

 

My work refers to the notions of preexisting ideas, knowledge and beliefs present in the mind, something that I’m born with rather than something I have learned through experience.

 

“After the Rain” Oil on Canvas, 39” x 28”

“After the Rain” Oil on Canvas, 39” x 28”

 

It’s a memory beyond the consequence of time—a creative look at the processes that happen underneath our reality. I just want to explore it from a slightly different angle.

 

“Water Garden” Oil on Canvas, 35” x 35”

“Water Garden” Oil on Canvas, 35” x 35”

 

In the end, however, my hope is that those who view my work may participate in the creative process—perceiving the painting only as a foundation that waits for their minds to draw upon it any picture they want.

 

Artist Alexey Adonin invites you to follow him on Facebook and Instagram.

 

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Featured Artist Heather Kinkade

Artist Heather Kinkade’s intricately detailed handcarved gourds are inspired by the natural world. Visit her website to learn more.

 

"Talons - Eagles" Carved and Wood-Burned Gourd with Acrylic and Color Pencil, 20"W x 17"H x 22"D

“Talons – Eagles” Carved and Wood Burned Gourd with Acrylic and Colored Pencil, 20″W x 17″H x 22″D

 

I have always felt at one with nature, from playing outside in the environment during my childhood in Wyoming, to focusing on Landscape Architecture and Sustainability for my higher education studies in Arizona.

 

"Great Horned Owl" Carved and Wood-Burned Half Gourd with Acrylic and Color Pencil, 8"W x 16"H x 4"D

“Great Horned Owl” Carved and Wood Burned Half Gourd with Acrylic and Colored Pencil, 8″W x 16″H x 4″D

 

I have been an environmental designer throughout my entire professional life, peaking when I became a manager overseeing the design process. When the economy dropped to the point that indicated there would be no future land development, I realized I needed to reinvent myself. That’s when I decided to bring designing back into my own hands.

 

Artist Heather Kinkade in her studio

Artist Heather Kinkade in her studio

 

It wasn’t until I discovered gourds as a medium, did I fully understand my design ability and how it could be applied to the art world. I would have never thought I would be doing art with once-living plant materials. In addition, it is especially fun for me to note my continued connection to Mother Nature as she creates the gourd shapes for my art.

 

"Blue Glory" (Top and Side Views) Carved and Wood-Burned Gourd with Acrylic and Color Pencil, 12"W x 10"H x 12"D

“Blue Glory” (Top and Side Views) Carved and Wood Burned Gourd with Acrylic and Colored Pencil, 12″W x 10″H x 12″D

 

My designs come from nature and focus on flora and fauna. My work is also influenced by Native American art, especially noted in the background textures I create on the gourd shell. I am known for my faux basket patterns and faux leather tooling.

 

"Ancient Times" Carved and Wood-Burned Gourd with Acrylic and Color Pencil, 21"W x 15"H x 21"D

“Ancient Times” Carved and Wood-Burned Gourd with Acrylic and Color Pencil, 21″W x 15″H x 21″D

 

All my design lines are wood burned into the gourd shell, and all my textures are created by carving into the shell. My color is added to the wood burned patterns with acrylic paint and colored pencil. The colored pencil allows the lights and darks in the gourd shell to show through, adding an antique look to the piece.

 

Duck Commission - Mallard Side, Carved and Wood-Burned Gourd with Acrylic and Color Pencil, 14"W x 16"H x 14"D

Duck Commission – Mallard Side, Carved and Wood Burned Gourd with Acrylic and Colored Pencil, 14″W x 16″H x 14″D

 

I use very warm, earthy colors with minimal embellishments. I create all my adornments for the stem and typically incorporate some of these adornments into the design.

 

"Copper Feather Mask" Carved and Wood-Burned Gourd with Acrylic, Color Pencil and Watercolor Paper, 12"W x 20"H x 6"D

“Copper Feather Mask” Carved and Wood Burned Gourd with Acrylic, Colored Pencil and Watercolor Paper, 12″W x 20″H x 6″D

 

The feather embellishments on my gourd masks are handmade from a very heavy watercolor paper, which means the feathers will have a longer life than a natural feather. To tie all the design elements together, I have found that geometric paths, or ribbons, help the viewer’s eye move around my creations.

 

"River Runs Through It" (Cattails, Bison, Moose and Trout Sides) Carved and Wood-Burned Gourd with Acrylic and Color Pencil, 14"W x 15"H x 14"D

“River Runs Through It” (Cattails, Bison, Moose and Trout Sides) Carved and Wood Burned Gourd with Acrylic and Colored Pencil, 14″W x 15″H x 14″D

 

Being a designer has allowed me to easily take my rough concept from paper and apply it to the three-dimensional gourd surface. For me, the larger the gourd the better; it gives me a bigger canvas to work my designs and tell my story.

 

"Rules of the Roost" (Raven Side) Carved and Wood-Burned Gourd with Acrylic and Color Pencil, 13"W x 14"H x 13"D

“Rules of the Roost” (Raven Side) Carved and Wood Burned Gourd with Acrylic and Colored Pencil, 13″W x 14″H x 13″D

 

I love creating mini stories as they give the designs more appeal. One of the stories is about two ravens that see the footprints of a bear and try to tell the rabbit to beware of the danger. All of these elements are on the gourd as you turn it around.

 

"The One that Got Away" (Front, Side and Side 2) 6.5"W x 10"H x 6.5"D

“The One that Got Away” (Front, Side and Side 2) 6.5″W x 10″H x 6.5″D

 

Another story is about the one that got away. Two eagles have animals inside their bellies, but the lizard got away. Simple stories, but they give meaning to the design. My botanical gourds are intended to be more of a celebration of the plant versus a story.

 

"Shard Bowl" Carved and Wood-Burned Gourd with Acrylic and Color Pencil, 12"W x 10"H x 12"D

“Shard Bowl” Carved and Wood Burned Gourd with Acrylic and Colored Pencil, 12″W x 10″H x 12″D

 

The western and contemporary gourds showcase a celebration of leather tooling and geometric patterns.

 

"Come of Age" Cast Glass, 7"W x 6"H x 4"D

“Come of Age” Cast Glass, 7″W x 6″H x 4″D

 

At this time, I feel the need to try to recreate my art similar to how a two-dimensional artist creates a giclée of their work so I can make multiples of the same design. I have started to achieve this by carving a gourd, making a mold of it, and casting a glass gourd. This has given me a wonderful alternative in a completely different medium—all based off the gourd. I am having so much fun, who knows where the world of art will lead me next?

 

Artist Heather Kinkade invites you to follow her on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest and LinkedIn.

 

Want to stay current on cutting edge business articles from Artsy Shark, plus artist features, and an invitation to the next Call for Artists? Subscribe to our twice-monthly Updates, and get a free e-book on Where to Sell Art Online right now!

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The post Featured Artist Heather Kinkade appeared first on Artsy Shark.

Make Your Own Curved Card Scraper

curved_scraper_shape

If you didn’t get a chance to purchase one of the Crucible curved card scrapers, you can make your own with a dry grinder and an existing card scraper. It takes about 30 minutes.

Download and print out the following template. It’s a hand-drawn version of Chris Williams’s scraper, which is where our design started.

chriswilliams_scraper_shape

Cut it out and affix it to your card scraper with the help of spray adhesive. Or make a cardboard template and trace its shape on your scraper with a permanent marker.

At your grinder, set the tool rest to 0° – parallel to the floor. Dress the wheel of your grinder (we use an #80-grit wheel, but a #60 or #100 will also do) so it has a slight convex shape. This convexity in the wheel makes the scraper easier to shape.

Get a bucket of water and put it by the grinder.

(Hey wait, where are the step photos? I’m in a hotel room that’s 400 miles from my shop. You are going to have to use your imagination.)

Place the scraper on the tool rest and start grinding the excess metal away. Don’t work on one part of the scraper for more than a few seconds. Keep moving around the perimeter. After 10 or 15 seconds, try to pinch the scraper with a finger and thumb. If….

… you can pinch the scraper with no pain, continue to grind.

… your fingers reflexively jump away, cool the scraper in your water bucket.

… you smell bacon, also cool the scraper in the water bucket.

Once you have ground down to your line, you will have become pretty good at grinding flat shapes – congrats. Now you need to remove the grinder marks from the edges.

Use a block of wood to hold the scraper at 90° on a coarse diamond stone and stone the edges. Remove all the scratches from the grinder. Then move up to a #1,000-grit waterstone (or soft Arkansas) and then up to a polishing stone. Then you can proceed with normal scraper-sharpening procedures.

This is exactly how I made all of our prototypes. I promise that you will become emotionally involved with your scraper after putting all the work into it, and you might not ever want to buy one of ours.

So be it.

— Christopher Schwarz