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Featured Artist Kim Howes Zabbia

Artist Kim Howes Zabbia’s free-flowing abstract paintings reveal realism emerging through layers of color and form. Enjoy her portfolio and visit her website to see more.

 

Abstract painting with birds by Kim Howes Zabbia

“Blackbird” Acrylic on Panel, 40” x 30” x 2”

 

I begin each painting with empty thoughts and zero pre-planning. The free-flowing paint appears at first to be abstract; yet in no time, realism peeks through layers of color and form. Once that happens, I can stop at any time and hope that controlled brushstrokes have brought balance to the chaos.

 

Abstract painting by Kim Howes Zabbia

“Echo” Acrylic on Canvas, 40” x 30” x 2”

 

My life has been surrounded by art, embellished by art and nurtured by art since I was in the third grade growing up in Ponchatoula, Louisiana. I moved slowly from simple childhood contests to portraits, poster work and photo realism. I paused for a midcareer M.F.A. in Studio Art at L.S.U. before finally reaching full scale abstracts and gallery representation.

 

Abstract diptych painting by Kim Howes Zabbia

“Encamp” Acrylic on 2 Panels, 60” x 40” x 2”

 

All the while, I have been teaching art to high schoolers, then to adults. I encourage them to have the guts to “talk art” and not be intimidated by the elite world of air-quote “artists” and snobby gallerists.

 

Abstract painting by Kim Howes Zabbia

“Encounter” Acrylic on Panel, 48” x 36” x 2”

 

I force my students to ignore prior myths that they must be born with talent, that they are too old to start making art, that the real art world does not want them.

 

Abstract painting by Kim Howes Zabbia

“Cathartic I” Acrylic on Panel, 40” x 30” x 2”

 

Away from the classroom, when I work in my own studio, I drown myself in paint hoping that something miraculous will happen. Sometimes, it does; many times, it doesn’t. Yet I persist, always locked in a struggle between control and freedom.

 

Abstract painting by Kim Howes Zabbia

“Flight” Acrylic on Panel, 48” x 36” x 2”

 

During this alone time, I have to face my own fears, my masked insecurity, my typically Southern response to make it all into a joke. Then I return to my art students, switch on my teacher face and masquerade as a seasoned artist who knows all.

 

Abstract painting by Kim Howes Zabbia

“Gentle” Acrylic on Canvas, 48” x 36” x 1.5”

 

My life is no different from other artists. We all have our private studio moments before we must wake up and rejoin the rigors of society. I thrive on this opposites’ game though.

 

Abstract painting by Kim Howes Zabbia

“Shiver” Acrylic on 2 Panels, 72” x 24” x 2”

 

After retiring from high school teaching in 2007, I opened The Art Station, an art school for adults, in downtown Ponchatoula. Since 1990, I’ve had twenty-four solo exhibits to compound my teaching duties including a twenty-four year retrospective exhibit at the Pensacola, Florida, Museum of Art in 2014.

 

Abstract painting by Kim Howes Zabbia

“Tangent II” Acrylic on Panel, 36” x 24” x 2”

 

I’ve taken breaks from art, but only long enough to write two books about my thoughts on art. I authored Painted Diaries: A Mother and Daughter’s Experience through Alzheimer’s (Fairview Press, 1996), and most recently Just Paint, It Ain’t: Demystifying the Complex Marriage of Artists and Their Viewers (2019).

 

Artist Kim Howes Zabbia in her studio beginning a new painting (Photo Credit: Johnny Chauvin)

Artist Kim Howes Zabbia in her studio beginning a new painting (Photo Credit: Johnny Chauvin)

 

Yet I always come back to the art. As I watch viewers see my paintings for the first time, I see them pause to study, knowing in their hearts there is more subject matter there than initially meets the eye. Each time they do pause, I hope to stimulate their imaginations with a visual scavenger hunt for reality. It will give us both comfort if they find it.

 

Artist Kim Howes Zabbia invites you to follow her on Instagram, Facebook and Linktree.

 

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The post Featured Artist Kim Howes Zabbia appeared first on Artsy Shark.

You Must Obey the First Rule of the Art Business or Risk Failure

You must understand and obey the first rule of the art business. Rule #1 establishes the ironclad premise that on the business side of your career, nothing happens until somebody buys your art. You can make the most beautiful, powerful, spellbinding, and compelling art possible. However, until it passes hands to someone who willingly steps […]

The post You Must Obey the First Rule of the Art Business or Risk Failure appeared first on Art Marketing News | Prosperous Ideas for Artists.

Featured Artist Larry Wolf

Artist Larry Wolf uses acrylics and raw canvas to create unpredictable, charged paintings that explode off the canvas. See more of his work by visiting his website.

 

"Creation" abstract acrylic painting by Larry Wolf

“Creation” acrylic on raw canvas, 48″ x 36″

 

As an attorney, my experience is extensive. I practiced criminal defense law for over four decades. As an artist, I am self-taught and passionate. My work reflects an intensity of emotion and thought, honed through a lifetime of rich and expansive interactions with the world and the fascinating people who live in it.

 

Abstract painting by Larry Wolf

“From Shoreline to Shoreline” Acrylic on Raw Canvas, 24″ x 24″

 

My art conveys an intriguing attempt to combine my passion for law with my love for artistic expression through bold textures and vibrant colors.

 

Abstract painting by Larry Wolf

“Inspiration” Acrylic on Raw Canvas, 48″ x 72″

 

Dedicating over forty years to building my legal skills, I explore my experiences in this field through introspection that is expressed in my series of original paintings entitled “A Brush with the Law”.

 

Abstract painting by Larry Wolf

“Athens on Fire” Acrylic on Raw Canvas, 24″ x 24″

 

My emergence into art was paved by my spiritual teacher who emphasized creativity and the necessity of getting out of the way of one’s own head. I soon discovered that, even though I couldn’t sing or dance, I was intrigued by the use of color and texture.

 

Abstract painting by Larry Wolf

“Raw” Acrylic on Raw Canvas, 72″ x 48″

 

Through meditation and keen observation, my creativity has blossomed. Painting has become an outlet that has taken me on a journey that I share with the viewer through works that are as intriguing to the mind as they are a delight to the eye.

 

Abstract painting by Larry Wolf

“Wave of Fire” Acrylic on Raw Canvas, 36″ x 36″

 

My unique use of raw canvas allows its bare essence to create an interplay of primitive energy and sophisticated emotions. A very absorptive surface, raw canvas propels me to create unpredictable, explosive and vibrant results.

 

Brightly colored acrylic abstract painting by artist Larry Wolf

“Spontaneous” Acrylic, 72″ x 48″

 

I have also carried this exploration of surface to the use of silkscreens, requiring the application of paint from the back of the material, again producing unanticipated textures and formations as well as unique and dramatic results.

 

Abstract painting by Larry Wolf

“Lost in the City” Acrylic on Raw Canvas, 24″ x 24″

 

Color dictates and controls not only what I paint, but also the medium that I paint with. Pieces of discarded objects often magically find their way onto my canvas. Those objects call out to me for the colors that will convey their unique messages and emotions to the viewer. They are as much a part of my art as the law is a part of my vocation. Each piece I create expresses the artist’s struggle and joy in communicating my heart, mind, and soul as I travel through a systematic world.

 

Artist Larry Wolf

Artist Larry Wolf

 

My work reflects my never-ending search for new alternatives and solutions to problems both in art and in the courtroom. I am driven to always look at things in new ways, and if successful, my paintings can inspire others to do the same.

 

Artist Larry Wolf invites you to follow him on Facebook and Instagram.

 

Want to stay current on cutting edge business articles from Artsy Shark, plus artist features, and an invitation to the next Call for Artists? Subscribe to our twice-monthly Updates, and get a free e-book on Where to Sell Art Online right now!

YES PLEASE!

For Email Marketing you can trust.

The post Featured Artist Larry Wolf appeared first on Artsy Shark.

Make Your Own Curved Card Scraper

curved_scraper_shape

If you didn’t get a chance to purchase one of the Crucible curved card scrapers, you can make your own with a dry grinder and an existing card scraper. It takes about 30 minutes.

Download and print out the following template. It’s a hand-drawn version of Chris Williams’s scraper, which is where our design started.

chriswilliams_scraper_shape

Cut it out and affix it to your card scraper with the help of spray adhesive. Or make a cardboard template and trace its shape on your scraper with a permanent marker.

At your grinder, set the tool rest to 0° – parallel to the floor. Dress the wheel of your grinder (we use an #80-grit wheel, but a #60 or #100 will also do) so it has a slight convex shape. This convexity in the wheel makes the scraper easier to shape.

Get a bucket of water and put it by the grinder.

(Hey wait, where are the step photos? I’m in a hotel room that’s 400 miles from my shop. You are going to have to use your imagination.)

Place the scraper on the tool rest and start grinding the excess metal away. Don’t work on one part of the scraper for more than a few seconds. Keep moving around the perimeter. After 10 or 15 seconds, try to pinch the scraper with a finger and thumb. If….

… you can pinch the scraper with no pain, continue to grind.

… your fingers reflexively jump away, cool the scraper in your water bucket.

… you smell bacon, also cool the scraper in the water bucket.

Once you have ground down to your line, you will have become pretty good at grinding flat shapes – congrats. Now you need to remove the grinder marks from the edges.

Use a block of wood to hold the scraper at 90° on a coarse diamond stone and stone the edges. Remove all the scratches from the grinder. Then move up to a #1,000-grit waterstone (or soft Arkansas) and then up to a polishing stone. Then you can proceed with normal scraper-sharpening procedures.

This is exactly how I made all of our prototypes. I promise that you will become emotionally involved with your scraper after putting all the work into it, and you might not ever want to buy one of ours.

So be it.

— Christopher Schwarz